Breaking a World Record with 10KSA

December 12, 201d5

The big day. Finally. So much planning and preparation and stress… but I think we’re ready to break a world record!!!

I was so excited to start this day and bring awareness to the women of Saudi and empower them… and help them break a world record!

I checked into Princess Noura University Sports Complex by 0800 with all my First Aid Team… A team of nurses and doctors from the university hospital would be joining us later in the day.

The day started out gorgeous (ended beautifully also!). The winter sun was out… warming us gently as the temperature wasn’t much above 10 degrees.

First thing, we signed in, got our 10KSA sweaters… and then went to the First Aid center and attempted to organize first aid supplies… which we didn’t have and wouldn’t have for hours yet until the University Hospital opened up and our physician and her team of nurses would bring them. I was seriously stressing that we wouldn’t get the first aid supplies and I was praying we wouldn’t have any emergencies before supplies arrived, and hopefully no emergencies at all! but with 10,000+ women scheduled to arrive, it seemed unlikely that would we end the day without any issues.

Mid-morning we put all our planning on hold to meet together with all the other volunteers (at least 2000 women!!) for an beautiful message from our fearless leader Princess Reema. So excited to start the event and start seeing people come around!)

Much of the morning and early afternoon was spent just wandering around the facility before the event actually started… checking out all the displays and booths and the various areas. There an Awareness Zone (where all the booths on health and wellness were set up), Nutrition (all the food… some of it was seriously gourmet!!!), Active (basically a full on gym set up with yoga center, spin class, zumba/dance classes, and active wear/food products, etc!), and finally the Fun Zone where Luxury Events had set up a photobooth, a carnival, clothes/artsy things to purchase, as well as a beautiful group painting women could participate in… it was lovely.

My favorite place was the Active Zone… the decoration was incredibly well done. And there was constantly music and laughter coming from within the zone as women participated in the various fitness classes…

At one point late in the afternoon when I actually had time to walk around and enjoy everything, the sun was setting over the Active zone and the sun shining through all the gauze and streamers and wooden supports… it was gorgeous!

I spent the whole day, from 0800 to nearly 2400 rapidly walking from one end of the sports complex to the other. Our main First Aid center was in the sports complex building at the far end, and completely at the other end of the complex was the Stadium where we had our main first aid outpost.

Finally… the most important part of the event… the highlight of the whole day.. the formation of the Worlds Largest Human Health Awareness ribbon. Around 7pm, women started lining up to be counted to go into the stadium to form the ribbon. Hundreds of volunteers had been recruited and trained to help with ribbon formation… they’d been scurrying around for hours getting organized… but trying to organize roughly 10,000 women is a monumental task! But they did so well!! The first aid volunteers joined all the women in the stadium, helping the other volunteers get the women organized in the ribbon, as well as being accessible in case of emergency.

There was beautiful inspirational music playing and the 10KSA theme song…

All the women were given pink tarha’s to wear to cover their heads… the Tarhas were beautiful with gorgeous Saudi themed prints on the ends… and the pink was a gorgeous fuschia color!!

I joined the ribbon also just before the final count… standing there with hopefully 10,000 women, united in anticipation… united in the uniqueness of our position in Saudi Arabia and the significance of this day and this moment for women… united in support of one another to raise awareness for a disease that devastates us all in some way… filled with hope…

Finally, the most inspirational moment of the day… the representative from Guiness World Records went on stage and presented Princess Reema and the women of Saudi Arabia with… the new world record!!!! 8,264 participants… the worlds largest human health awareness ribbon. And it was all women. All women living in Saudi Arabia… at this moment crushing the stereotype of a country known for its repression of women… a country filled with so many of the strongest and most ambitious and dedicated and inspirational women I’ve ever met.

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To be part of that moment… standing there with 8,264 women celebrating our strength and celebrating women coming together to empower each other and raise awareness about a horrific disease that impacts every single one of us in some way. My heart was so full. These women are incredible. And I am so blessed to have been a part of this day… and to see into their lives in this country…

Of all the opportuniities I’ve had in Saudi Arabia and the amazing experiences… this one is by far the best. I’ll never forget how it felt to stand there with all those women… I’ll never forget the beautiful women who organized the event and how they inspired me with their courage and strength… We are blessed. Truely blessed.

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#notjustanurse

For a month or so in September/October 2015

By this time, I’d spent a good 4 weeks at home, just slothing (being a lazy bum) and vacationing… not being particularly productive with my life other than agonizing over what I’d do next with my life and whether i’d go back to Saudi or stay in North America.

I decided it was time to step out of my funk and get on with work. Things would eventually fall into place with a long-term plan again… but while I sorted it out, I was desperate for some good, proper, really hands-on nursing again. I was going through patient care withdrawls.

Also, Miss Colorado (in some pageant) just made a major statment in international entertainment news when she wore scrubs and a stethoscope and went onstage and talked about her role as a nurse. But what really caught the world’s attention, and especially the attention of nurses around the world, was when a few ignorant talk show hosts, specifically the ladies of The View, made mention of her “doctor’s stethoscope” wondering why she as a nurse was even wearing a “doctor’s stethoscope.” Obviously, we were all a little offended. Nurses united around the world, speaking out on social media against the ladies of the view, and promoting our profession in whatever way possible!

Miss Colorado: Not Just a Nurse

So, I returned to work with great pride as a nurse, wearing my “doctor’s stethoscope”, grateful that I’d chosen this wonderful profession and not medicine. Because I chose to be a nurse and not a doctor. Nursing was not my fallback. I didn’t go into it because I couldn’t get into med school. I could have gone to med school. But instead I chose to be a nurse, to spend more time working directly with patients, being their main point of contact, being that person to see them at and help them through their most vulnerable times!

I have my very own stethoscope, and I use my stethoscope to listen to my patients lungs to ensure they’re not filling with fluid/developing a pleural effusion/observe for signs of infection… to listen to their hearts to make sure they’re in a normal rhythm… to auscultate their bowels to ensure things are moving through properly and to detect when they’re not so that I can fix the problem. Unfortunately, part of my job is also to use my stethoscope to auscultate a heart that is silent and no longer pumping blood throughout the body, and lungs that are no longer breathing and filling blood with oxygen… and then to tell a patients family in the kindest but always most inadequate words, that I hear nothing anymore and confirm what they already suspected, that the one they love is deceased. And it’s me, the nurse, who has to do that, not the doctor, with my very own stethoscope. However… that being said, I don’t mind it, because next I get to hug them all, and do exactly what I went into nursing for… to offer comfort and support and care for people at the most difficult moment in their lives. So, I’m very proud to be a nurse and part of this very honorable profession. I can’t imagine being anything else!

When I first graduated from nursing school, I was blessed to get a fulltime job on the unit I did my final practicum on, a Tertiary Palliative Care Unit. I know I put the unit way up high on a pedastal, and I consider my colleagues on the unit to be the very best nurses I’ve ever worked with. Maybe it’s just because they’re the first nursing team I’ve really been a part of? Maybe it’s because they’re the team that raised me from a green, super fresh and young baby nurse to the nurse I am today? Maybe I’m just super biased?

But then I think about it a little more and remember how I saw them interact with patients and their families on a daily basis… their infinite care and compassion… seriously, the most caring group of individuals I’ve ever met. Nurses with a heart and passion for one of the most difficult fields of nursing practice… nurses who daily pull together as a team and are so supportive of each other as it’s the only way to survive in such an intensely emotional environment… nurses who advocate daily for nothing but the best for their patients and consistently put a patients needs and desires above their own… nurses who go to great lengths to ensure comfort of both a patient and their family… nurses who go above and beyond every single day, without ever asking for or needing recognition, because it’s just what they do, it’s what they love to do.

They’re not just nurses. They ARE nurses. They are the people you want spending 24 hours a day with the person you love and who is at the most vulnerable and difficult point in their life. They are the person who will ensure that the one you love, is loved and taken care of so that they want nothing but to spend time with you in comfort and peace!

Palliative care nurses are a special breed of nurses. We are faced with death and dying and sadness on a daily basis. Yet we are happy, not sad and gloomy. And our unit is suprisingly filled with light and laughter and happiness, not just from the nurses but from our patients and families also. We’ve learned to see the good in everything, to find the shiny silver lining to it all! If we couldn’t see the flip side, it would be come intensely overwhelming and we’d all crash and burn out for sure. But we have each other, we have the most lovely patients and families… people who are generally focused on the good things in their lives and have let go of the bad because who wants to hang onto the bad and nasty things when theyre so clearly faced with their mortality?

I miss palliative care. I think it’s the best of everything in all health care disciplines brought together to create the most holistic and collaborative and patient/family centered care possible, care that is dedicated purely to meeting a patient’s goals and ensuring their comfort in everything! Due to the culture, the lack of education on palliative care, and just general misconceptions, palliative care doesn’t really exist in Saudi, at least not at all in the way it does in North America, and it really is a shame. While I was home I read the most fantastic book by Atul Gawande called “Being Mortal” who suggested that patients who have palliative care services involed in their care, generally tend to live 25% longer. That’s an extremely significant result. Depending on the estimated time frame, it could be anywhere from extra days to extra years… but if it were me, I’d take anything I could get, especially when it only means that I’d be more comfortable and experience less symptoms and side effects…

Anyways. I was so happy to get back into palliative care and work with my favourite colleagues for a good month while home. I was worried that I would have lost a lot of my skills as I’d been out of inpatient care for well over a year by this time, and outpatients is much different! But… it was like riding a bike… but so much better!!!!

I probably drove my colleagues crazy with all my comparisons of Saudi to home. But i forgot how well stocked our supply room is at home… all the time!!! Like heaps of IV fluids in all sizes and all flvours… NS, D5W, 2/3 1/3, lactated ringers, NS with 10, 20 or 40 KCL… it’s amazing!! And we never run out of IV lines either like we do in Saudi!!!

And don’t even get me started on the narcotic prescribing and accessibility!!! Appropriate doses, with ranges for nurses to use base on patient needs… with normal time frames for administration (anywhere from q30min for a PRN to scheduled q4hourly analgesics)… and then all the adjuvants… gabapentin, citalopram, etc… and meds to manage all the side effects of narcotics… And a Pyxis (electronic drug cabinet) filed with everything from Tylenol #3 (shit) to Morphine/Hydromorphine/Fentanyl/Methadone!! It was amazing!! In Saudi we have Morphine (5:1, i’ve never seen anything more than 5mg IV prescibed unless palliative care services was somehow involved and the patient was recieving long acting morphine 10mg) Demoral (who still uses that crap except ER??!!) and Tramadol (even more ridiculous especially as it seems to be the drug of choice for oncology physicians in Saudi!).

And our doctors… oh my goodness… they’re so fabulous. They’ll just sit and spend anywhere from half an hour to an hour just talking through problems with patients and their familes. And they’re so open to suggestions from nursing!!!! I feel valued and respected! It’s wonderful!!! (and the feeling is very much mutual!)

Anyways… enough comparison… I’ll just mention again how much I adore my colleagues, how much I loved spending so many nightshifts just catching up with them, how much I loved working as a casual and picking up heaps of shifts in a two week period so that I manageed to work with almost every single nurse on the unit, and how much I loved our Thanksgiving night potluck… it was wonderful!!

Wearing colored scrubs with no repercussions… instead of shapeless/baggy white scrubs!! Personally I think they’re so much more cheerful and make me much more approachable… plus, hello?… white coat syndrome??!!!  Also, In Saudi, I’m not allowed to drink coffee on the unit unless i’m in the staffroom, and getting caught drinking coffee at the nurses desks can result in a serious talking to/written warning… so I very gleefully drank coffee on the unit/at my desk/in the lobby… all day long actually. I loved stopping at the Starbucks in the lobby for coffee breaks and drinking my coffee while looking out at the trees in the atrium… my seasonal “autumn” cup from Starbucks! And then… can’t forget stat holiday pay!!!!!! Working Thanksgiving night meant I got a couple hours of holiday pay… that’s another thing we don’t get in Saudi… (but considering we get 54 days vacation, i can’t really complain!!)

And then to top it all off.. breakfast with a few colleagues and a now moved on to Calgary colleague who came to visit with her adorable little munchkin…

 

And a wine night with one of my nursing school classmates who is now working on my old unit too…

I think it’s important to be able to sepearate our work and personal lives… but it is also amazing to be able to have a great relationship with your colleagues and spend time outside of work with them also!!!

So, when my last day of work in Canada came again… i was really sad to leave everyone behind again. (Not sure why i keep torturing myself with goodbyes!!!) But… back to the adventure… let’s see where this crazy ride takes me again!! I’ll be back again… and if not back to this unit… at least back to palliative care because every time i work in palliative care I know that is where my heart is… So… one day again soon…

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Riyadh 2014 Terry Fox Run

October 31, 2014

Today we run… or maybe walk… but either way, we participate in the Riyadh 2014 Terry Fox Run. As Canadians… and oncology nurses… it’s amazing to be able to participate in this event in honour of one of the most influential athletes/humanitarians in Canadian history… and to raise money for the Terry Fox Foundation. “A single dream. A world of hope.”

Terry Fox, aka Terrence Stanley Fox, was a Canadian who was passionate about many sports but unfortunately developed Osteosarcoma and had to have his leg amputated. Despite this amputation, in 1980, he began the “Marathon of Hope” and attempted to run across Canada in order to raise funds and awareness for cancer research. Unfortunately, after 143 days and 5373 kms, he lost his life to the cancer. But, he created a lasting legacy and the Terry Fox Foundation was created and every year, Canadians around the world run in the annual Terry Fox Run which has ben held every year since 1981.

So, as a group of Canadians… and girls of various other nationalities… we registered to run in Riyadh and this morning… got up bright and early to run at Salwa, a large compound near the outside the city of Riyadh.

Didn’t have time for coffee before leaving for Salwa… but no worries at all… they had Tim Hortons at the starting line!! This guaranteed that we wouldn’t be running as it is pretty difficult to run with a coffee and donut in hand… But we had a very joyous walk.

imageimage The sun was out, it was beautifully fresh and gorgeous. We shared a lot of laughs… starting out by laughing at ourselves as we were clearly not the brightest runners in the race… the start and finish line were both in the same place and somehow we started the race backwards…  we ran the wrong way through the finish line and backwards down the course. We were wondering if we were going the wrong way… we passed a lot of people going the opposite direction from us.. before we clued in that in fact we were going the wrong way. Felisha thought it was a hoot that we were just walking the wrong way and wanted to continue that way. Of course I was shwaya embarrassed… who runs the wrong way through a race?!! Only the crazy Canadian girls! Eventually we decided  it was silly to continue going the wrong way and turned around and went back and walked the correct way through the race path around the compound.

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I had so much energy… probably just because I was in such an absolutely fabulous mood… so I played a bit of EDM (electronic dance music) and we walked/danced our way through the race… singing and laughing and just generally absolutely enjoying ourselves!! These girls… they really are amazing company!!!! Mafi homesickness when I’m around them!!!

So we reached the finish line and took the required finish line photos… Not posers at all!!!! :S haha.

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Side note… Saudi’s don’t recycle. There are no recycling facilities… to my knowledge anyways. I always feel absolutely horrible when I have to throw away the 5 million plastic water bottles I drink from in a week into the regular garbage!! But… we found recycling at Salwa!! A bin for compost, waste and plastics!!! Vivian and I just had to take a picture with it!

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And then… we had brunch with all the race participants… waiting eagerly for our names to be called in the raffle for fabulous prices… none of us won anything though 😦 But… it was a great way to start the morning…

Looking forward to the next run… the next adventure… the next bit of awesomeness that Riyadh delivers me…

Changing Departments: Off to Oncology Clinic

October 23, 2014

So I’ve been in Saudi Arabia, in Riyadh, at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center for about 2.5 months now.

I had originally applied to KFSH&RC because I wanted to become an oncology nurse and learn chemotherapy. At home, it is fairly difficult to get into chemotherapy clinics as positions are usually snatched up by staff with much more seniority.

So learning that KFSH&RC was opening a big a new cancer center and looking to train new staff… I jumped at the opportunity to come here and learn new skills.

Unfortunately… but not really… I ended up in the Radiation Clinic for a few months initially as this is where I had some background experience back home. But after 2.5 months… of really not utilizing my Radiation Therapy nursing skills… and not much of my nursing skills in general… I realized I had to switch departments. To something a little more intense… where I’d actually learn what I’d come out to Saudi Arabia to do!

I requested a department transfer to the Oncology Clinic… and after a few weeks of following through the appropriate chanels… I landed an interview with the head nurse… who then offered me a job in the Oncology Clinic. YAY!! I would be trained in chemotherapy administration and also would take a basic oncology course to gain a greater understanding of oncology nursing.

Fortunately, between my Palliative ICU background and my Radiation Clinic experience from Canada… Oncology nursing isn’t completely new for me so I’ll have a bit of a leg to stand on… I hope!!

Anyways. Today is my last day in Radiation Clinic. I’ve loved getting to know a lot of the staff there and building relationships with them and some of the patients… However… it is time already … to move onto what I came out here to do…

Masalama Radiation Clinic… I’ll just be a couple floors above you now 😀

Nerd Alert: Can’t wait to start learning heaps of new things again!! I seriously love cancer care… it’s fascinating!! I could talk about it for ages… but I won’t bore you with my jabber of that at the moment.

So… enjoy this video… love the app… it had myself and my coworker Vivian, from back home, laughing hysterically for ages at work!! Stress relief!!

Enjoy…

 

Breast Cancer Awareness Day

October 21, 2014

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month… especially in North America. Follow the link below to learn more about how you can become more aware about Breast Cancer.

http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/breast-cancer-awareness-month

Today is Breast Cancer Awareness Day at KFSH&RC

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Breast Cancer is a devastating disease that affects many women and also men all around the world. It is a disease that the majority of us can relate to as we have most likely somehow been affected by it, whether we ourselves have had breast cancer, our mother, auntie, sister, friend, grandmother… or maybe we are cancer nurses and have had significant exposure to the impact of breast cancer on individuals and their families. It is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide, and although there have been significant advances made in the treatment of breast cancer, it is still a devastating disease.

In Saudi Arabia, breast cancer rates are high and similar to what they are in the rest of the world. However, the average age of diagnosis of Breast Cancer for women in Saudi Arabia is age 48 years old, an entire decade earlier than in North America! http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3370407/

One significant disadvantage is a lack or primary care and awareness about breast cancer and how to detect it early. Many women do not have a family doctor. They are not regularly assessed for their risk. Many women are unaware of how to perform breast self exams. There is no regular screening program either where women of a certain age regularly receive mammograms.

This all leads to later detection where the disease is further advanced and treatment options are not as easy or as simple as they are when the cancer is detected at a very early stage.

However, advances are being made in educating the public. And days like today, breast cancer awareness days, help to advance knowledge about Breast Cancer among women in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. And hopefully, one day there will be excellent screening programs in place for women and cancers will be detected more frequently at an early stage rather than at a more advanced stage.

Follow this link below to read an article from the Middle East Journal of Scientific Research… “A Review on Breast Cancer in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia”

http://www.idosi.org/mejsr/mejsr14%284%2913/14.pdf.

I hope one day women and men around the world will be fully aware of their risks,  and pray that one day everyone will have equal opportunites for monitoring for this terrible disease and treatment if required. I wish I was positive enough to believe that one day there will be a cure for this deadly disease, but the realist in me says that it is impossible as genetics deteriorate and we continue to lead unhealthy lives.

So please, be responsible for your heath. Do your BSE’s regularly (Breast Self Exams)… eat healthy… a diet with minimal fats and high in nutrients and colorful fruits and veggies containing heaps of antioxidants (cancer fighting molecules)… and exercise regularly! These things might not prevent you from getting breast cancer, but at least you know that they are less likely to be a factor in the development of cancer.

Much love to you all… I pray you are never affected by this terrible disease!

Love from your Oncology Nurse in Saudi Arabia…

xo

Annemarie

Welcome to the Radiation Team

September 18, 2014

Today is Thursday. And Thursday means it is a relatively quiet and lazy day in the Radiation Clinic. No doctors clinics. Just a few drop in patients who might need to see a nurse/doctor before the weekend but nothing scheduled.

So it is generally a day where we have inservices and various presentations for “staff development” and such.

And we also get to have parties!!!

I’ve been in Radiation Clinic for almost a month now, and Vivian has just arrived. So the unit held a welcome party for us… and a masalama (goodbye) party for Esperenza who is leaving us for another department.

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The great thing about Thursdays here in Radiation Clinic is that there are no official clinics so it is so much less busy… Although it does get a little boring! But today it’s a good thing because we could easily spend some time decorating the staff room…

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And easily spend an hour or so at lunch hanging out with the whole radiation interdisciplinary team… The radiation therapists, the nurses, even our head nurse and the doctors. I really really enjoy this group of people actually… and coming from a region in Canada, just outside Vancouver, where the majority of my coworkers were Caucasian as well as the majority of our patients… it is a wonderful experience to work with people from all around the world!!

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I must say… it is absolutely wonderful to have a coworker from back home here with me… it helps you gain perspective one days when its a little hard to find a positive perspective… or when you’re feeling particularly challenged by the differences in practice between Saudi Arabia and Canada… It’s nice to have a friend who understands where you come from and what it was like back home… So, I’m very happy to have Vivian here with me!

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There was so much food there it was a little ridiculous almost!! Asking everyone to bring a dish for a potluck results in excessive amounts of food. But in this extremely multicultural workplace, it’s great because we get to sample food from all over the world! Homemade sushi, Saudi dishes, Indian food, ceasar salad (my contribution as requested… Tried to make it with turkey bacon but it just doesn’t crisp up or taste as delicious on top of ceasar salad as the real stuff!!)

Anyways…. It was a really great way to end the workweek… especially because after the potluck, all of us nurses just sat around chit chatting and building friendships with each other!

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The end. Have a wonderful weekend everyone!!!

xx

Annemarie

We do work some days…

September 2014

So… I know it seems like all I do is have fun out here (and that would be pretty accurate!!), but I do also do some work!!

I’ve finished a couple weeks of orientation now and I’m really enjoying a lot of things about my new workplace… My radiation clinic coworkers are absolutely lovely human beings with such warm and loving hearts!! I feel extremely welcomed into the department and it’s a wonderful feeling.

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We have plenty of time to chit chat and build rapport and it is really really nice to build relationships with my new work family! I am going to spend the majority of my time here in Saudi with them… a minimum of 44hours a week… so it is a good thing that we all get along well!!

The actual nursing… I’m not going to go into much detail… but as I think I’ve mentioned… it is much different from back home. I don’t do a lot of nursey-nursey stuff… and I do really miss the nursey stuff!!!

Although I did have a couple hours in the recovery room today with the little kiddies as they recover post Ggeneral anesthesia for radiation treatment… Definitely more “nursey” skills involved!!!

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(one half of our recovery room… shown above)

One of the biggest challenges I’m facing now, is the language barrier!! I knew it would be a challenge before I even moved to Saudi, but a couple weeks of general orientation and being constantly surrounded by English speaking people, put me in a slightly delusional state, forgetting that it wouldn’t always be that way!

So now, when I do happen to have a patient who actually speaks English enough to communicate with me or to understand me fairly well (when combined with an excessive amount of hand guestures), I feel this overwhelming sense of joy as I can really get into nurse mode and ask them questions and assess them properly and teach them things about managing their side effects! It’s wonderful!

I had a patient with breast cancer one day… and she showed up in the clinic with her daughter. They were both very well dressed individuals and spoke remarkably beautiful English, and seemed like highly intelligent and knowledgable people. It was only the beginning of this woman’s cancer treatments, so she asked me what she could do to prevent her skin from breaking down. (Note: one of the most common side effects of Radiation Therapy is Radiation Dermatitis… where the skin breaks down due to the radiation damaging the poor little surface and deeper cells).

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This is when I’m in my element… Educating patients!! (Very very rarely get to do that here as it is generally not our role… again, largely due to the language barrier.) So I got to tell this lovely lady and her daughter all about how to keep the skin clean and moist and to moisturize regularly and what type of products to use and things to avoid in the products. And they soaked it all up, and asked lots of questions. It was wonderful. I felt like I actually was able to fully do my job for the first time in a while!! Hopefully, this patient will have learned from what I taught her, and be able to take measures to prevent Boxes, B,C or D (above) from happening!!!

At home, at the BC Cancer Agency, we have well developed policies and protocols for managing side effects such as Radiation Dermatitis, plenty of handouts and leaflets and information sources for patients to help them prevent and manage these side effects. However, here at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, these policies and protocols haven’t been developed yet, although they are working on some of them. So I hope that myself and my colleague from home will be able to help them implement some strategies and information sources in order to reduce the risk of side effects in patients undergoing Radiation Therapy here. Prevention is key!!!

Anyways… enough jabbering… this turned out to be a long-ish post. But I figured I needed to put something up for once that wasn’t about parties and fun. Although as you can see, we do still have a lot of fun even at work!!

And we have lovely patients who bring us all sorts of deliciousness… just like at home. Like Reese’s Peanut Butter cups… Om nom nom!!

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So…

Ma’asalama

xo

Annemarie